I pay close attention to the comments on this blog. I’m shaping it according to what you want. So, would you be so kind as to vote in the poll below?

To choose more than one option, just mark your strongest choice and write the rest in the comments section. Thank you!

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I’ve got to come up with a better title than “GIG ALERT” for these opportunities that don’t pay anything. I mean, can you call writing for free a gig? Hmmm … Any ideas?

Anyway, PsychCentral’s World of Psychology blog, which has “1.1 million readers,” according to a recent post, reminded these readers that it accepts guest contributions:

Please send us your essays, commentary, opinion or rational (or sometimes irrational!) thoughts about anything in the world of psychology and mental health.

Here’s more information.

I’ve written about the pros and cons of writing for free. So I just post these opportunities and leave the decision up to you. But how would you like me to label them?

I’m a freelance writer and editor who specializes in working with doctors and other medical professionals. Read more here.

The blog Science-Based Medicine is searching for new bloggers “who can defend and discuss science-based medicine while writing cogently and entertainingly about it.” I didn’t see any mention of pay, in case that’s a factor for you. If you apply, good luck!

I’m a freelance writer and editor who specializes in working with doctors and other medical professionals. Read more here.

Posted by: Leigh Ann Otte | 03/02/10

How to write a nut graf—and reel in the readers

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Posted by: Leigh Ann Otte | 02/25/10

8 top blog posts (by doctors, nurses and a paramedic)

You guys are good.

I now subscribe to 45 blogs written by doctors and other health-care professionals. I’m impressed with your content. Oh, OK, I could offer a few suggestions … and, actually, I will!

In upcoming posts, I’ll tell you what the experts say about great blog writing, so stay tuned. In the meantime, in the spirit of the oft-heard writerly advice, “Read, read, read!” here are eight recently published posts I thought were noteworthy for specific reasons. Which do you like, and why?

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Posted by: Leigh Ann Otte | 02/22/10

How to write a memorable bio: creativity exercise 1

When you think of great artistry, what’s one main word that comes to mind?

For me, it’s vulnerability. Whether you’re writing fiction or nonfiction—a novel or a bio—I believe this is one of the most freeing, effective characteristics you can nurture. Doctors, accustomed to academic exchanges and staying safely detached, may find this particularly challenging. But you’ll also probably find it especially rewarding. I’d like to help you get your feet wet.

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Posted by: Leigh Ann Otte | 02/18/10

Should medical experts write for free? The pros and cons.

The idea of writing for free is a touchy subject in the freelance world. It comes into play with Web sites and upstart publications in particular. With limited money coming in, they have limited payments to give out.

This frustrates many freelance writers. But medical professionals have more aspects to consider than the average writer. Here’s a breakdown of the pros and cons for you, as I see them. Do you have more?

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Posted by: Leigh Ann Otte | 02/15/10

The top-10 words doctor writers should ban

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This post has moved. Please click here to view: How to Punctuate Bulleted Lists.


Posted by: Leigh Ann Otte | 02/12/10

Why this blog?

The first issue of what would soon be called "My Family Doctor" (2003)

In 2003, my dad, a family doctor, started a magazine.

As with many doctors, he was frustrated with how little time he got to spend with his patients—and frustrated with how little they knew about their own health. He figured he’d try another way to reach people: through the printed word. He’d create a national magazine that would be written by doctors and other health-care providers. No more iffy information from the lay media touting weak studies and fad diets. This would be the stuff you really needed to know.

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